Leave a comment

From Fail to Fabulous – The Design Process

In order to be ready to present at the National Art Education Association annual convention later this week, I’ve spent the better part of the weekend putting together presentations. The process of choosing which of many photos and videos to include based on their best fit with the concepts and “bigger ideas” within the presentations kept me starting and checking and revising and replacing, instead of quickly finishing up. I have thought a few times, “maybe this it”, only to think of another item or concept to include. At some point I realized, of course, the Design Process applies to creating presentations, too.

Because of this work, I missed out on attending the Massachusetts Art Education Association Youth Art Month celebration this afternoon. I was okay with it two weeks ago when I helped to hang the giant show, which features hundreds of pieces of artwork from K – 12 students across Massachusetts. I didn’t know then that one of my students, Andrew Murphy, would be honored with the one and only state Middle Level Award for his 3D design and printed castle.

Fortunately, Andrew and his family went to Boston today to see the show and enjoy the celebration and award ceremony. And they took photos. And they sent them to me!

Andrew with his castle (left)

Andrew with his castle (left)

Andrew with YAM Co-Chair Helen Downey

Andrew with YAM Co-Chair Helen Downey

So what about all of these smiles and this successful student has to do with failure? The beautiful castle in the picture above is the last of several iterations of the same design. Andrew started this project last spring. He had designed the castle with multiple out-buildings. The first time we printed it, there was so much raft and excess plastic that we had to cancel the make. A few times.

IMG_0027

First printing with excess raft and plastic

Andrew ended up revising his design several times until we were able to print it successfully. He eliminated the out-buildings and beefed up the platforms. At one point they were sheered as well. Several months later we were able to print it out!

First successful print.

First successful print.

This is what Andrew’s design looks like in the 123D Design app on an iPad.

IMG_0019

This is what it looks like being printed:

And here is the award winning piece:

Andrew ps

Designing for 3D printing is easy as creativity and play, but becomes challenging when preparing for the printing. Often there are many reworks along the way. Andrew has the will and determination to stick with a project through numerous iterations. He deserves the award he received today. Congratulations to Andrew and his family!

2 Comments

Congratulations to Andrew, Youth Art Month Award Winner!

Casually checking my school email on a Sunday evening and BAM! Andrew Murphy has won the Sargent Art Middle Level Award at the MAEA Youth Art Month showing Boston with his 3D design and Printed piece, “Castle”!

Here is the email that I opened today:

Andrew castle

Congratulations to Andrew and his family indeed! And thanks for winning a box of art supplies for our classroom, too!

The Massachusetts Art Education Association Youth Art Month Art Show is on display at the State Transportation building located at 8 Park Plaza from 9-5 daily through April 24. The family celebration, which is when Andrew will receive his award, is being held on March 22 from 12-4. Congratulations again, Andrew!

1 Comment

Dr. Seuss in the Middle

Who doesn’t love Dr. Seuss and Read Across America day? Right, absolutely no one. However, one must be clever to engage certain “too cool for school” middle school students around Dr. Seuss. I have long loved Dr. Seuss’s My Many Colored Days, illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher, and wanted to come up with an activity to follow a read aloud. A read aloud made engaging and accessible thanks to a document camera, that is.

My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss

I wanted to design a lesson that extended the concepts within the paintings in the book, especially the simple shapes and evolving color. My students had experimented with breaking up implied form with overlapping in a previous project. This occurs frequently within the illustrations as well.

img_5081-3

This book is also about moods associated with the different colors. In order to engage the middle school artists, I wanted to allow for personal connections. I also wanted to give them a chance to re-evaluate the the way they perceive color.

purple

These sound like intellectual goals, yet they were easily boiled down into a very manageable, hugely successful project that can be simplified or extended to reach artists of all abilities. And it involves hand tracing (as in turkey hands). How fun.

Madison K.

Madison K.

Students traced their hands at least five times, making sure they had created at least ten shapes with overlapping. They then colored in each shape with marker and outlined the hand shapes with a silver Sharpie. Students were encouraged to look at each color and consider words to describe how the color makes them feel and write the “mood”word on the colored shape with silver Sharpie. The last step was to cut around the shapes eliminating the background. EZPZ!

Sophia P.

Sophia P.

Sarah C.

Sarah C.

Melissa H.

Melissa H.

Ryan F.

Ryan F.

Lily B.

Lily B.

Katarina M.

Katarina M.

Chloe K.

Chloe K.

Brooke G.

Brooke G

Anna C.

Anna C.

Aly J.

Aly J.

I love the adjectives and nouns the artists chose for their “Mood Palettes”, words like “clever”, “stoic”, “creative”. The big plan is to group them together on mural paper to create a large collaborative piece. With a warm up exercise, the read aloud and the project, this lesson took two fifty-minute blocks. I used this as a sub plan because I had to be out one of the four days, otherwise tempera cakes would have been used to fill in the solid areas of color. With markers it is an easy sub plan. Enjoy!

Leave a comment

Congratulations To Our Youth Art Month Artists!

Please join me in congratulating the following students whose work will be on display at the Massachusetts Art Education Association Youth Art Month exhibit in Boston! From left to right in this photo are:

Owen Brigham, Grace Bernero, Lucie Nicholson, Vaishvi Patel, and Andrew Murphy

YAM

I am so very pleased and proud of these students and their wonderful artwork! The Youth Art Month exhibit is held at the State Transportation Building, which is located at 8 Park Plaza, Boston. The exhibit will be open March 9 through April 24 from 9 – 5 on weekdays. A family celebration will be held on Sunday, March 22 from 12 – 4. April vacation provides a convenient time for viewing the exhibit.

Here are some close-up photos and descriptions of the artists’ work:

Owen Brigham Castle 3D Design and Printing Grade 6

Owen Brigham
Castle
3D Design and Printing
Grade 6

Grace Bernero Owl Scratchboard Grade 6

Grace Bernero
Owl
Scratchboard
Grade 6

Lucie Nicholson Family Portrait Watercolor Pencil Grade 5

Lucie Nicholson
Family Portrait
Watercolor Pencil
Grade 5

Vaishvi Patel Self Portrait Charcoal Pencil Grade 6

Vaishvi Patel
Self Portrait
Charcoal Pencil
Grade 6

Andrew Murphy Castle 3D Design and Printing Grade 7

Andrew Murphy
Castle
3D Design and Printing
Grade 7

Youth Art Month celebrations and displays are held across the country during the month of March. Please congratulate these students when you see them as they represent Miscoe Hill in the celebration of Youth Art Month!

Leave a comment

Rotoscoping? Wait. What?

Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over footage, frame by frame, for use in live-action and animated films. Originally, recorded live-action film images were projected onto a frosted glass panel and re-drawn by an animator. This projection equipment is called a rotoscope. Although this device was eventually replaced by computers, the process is still referred to as rotoscopingWikipedia

Tessa S.

Tessa S.

Just before vacation, students spent time learning the method of Rotoscoping using their iPads. Long ago, I made still-life arrangements using bottles, cans, milk cartons, and geometric solids which I had painted in varying values of gray. They are very handy for showing students how to express value and form using only black and white and the shades in between.

Kaelyn E.

Using the iPad camera, students took a photo of the still-life arrangement, used the crop tool and the filters to make it black and white, then uploaded it to a layer on Sketchbook Express. They then created a new layer, on which they used the paintbrush with a radius between 4-6 to draw the outlines of the forms. Using the color target to find the correct shade of gray, they used the flood fill tool on the same layer as the outlines to fill the shapes. They merged the layers, deleted the photo, and then uploaded their art to Artsonia.

Kendall J.

The students were pleased that their drawings looked just like the still life arrangements. I was pleased that we had covered shape, line, value, form, perspective, foreground, middle ground, background, space, still life, and animation basics.

Madison B.

By uploading images to Artsonia, I can see them all for a quick assessment, and families can see what their children are doing in art. Students develop a sense of sharing with an audience and learn to revise and edit until the work is “share-worthy”.

Meghan Porter

When we return to school we will be exploring value with the air brush tool, rather than the flood fill tool. Check back later in the week to see how we are doing.

Tori LopezThese are just a few of the Rotoscoped pieces, see the rest of this display on Artsonia at www.artsonia.com/teachers/members/exhibits/artwork.asp?id=920069

Leave a comment

Now You As The Viewer, Imagine What Happens Next*

*The title of this post is pulled from Ryan’s artist statement, which is near the bottom of the page.

The truth is, I’ve been so busy this winter that I haven’t had time to write many posts and to showcase the work we are doing in class. It’s all good, as they say, with the exception of relentless snow shoveling over the past three weeks! Somehow all this snow art in this post makes me feel better.

Now that the whole school has iPads, it is time to learn how to use them to create digital art. We began our foray into digital art making on iPads with guided drawing using Sketchbook Express. Along with learning how to use the app, students were able to focus on the concepts of form, space, foreground, middle ground, background, shading, value, and atmospheric perspective. On the iPad, we were using the paintbrush, flood fill, airbrush, and layers, all the while being aware of radius and opacity. We started with the following guided drawing, as the students followed along step-by-step. This image is straight off my iPad – unedited beyond what was done as I led the class.

Guided Drawing Snowman

Guided Drawing Snowman

The following images are those that students created as they worked individually to apply what they had learned. Students were asked to draw at least two snow figures in a snowy field, to add trees, a sky, to dress the snow figure somehow, and to shade the snow spheres to make them look 3D. Students then uploaded them to our online Artsonia gallery and added a 5 – 7 sentence artist statement. These are some of the results.

Brooke G.

Brooke

Brooke’s artist statement: The snowmen (and women!) enjoy the sunset just as anyone else. Snow capped mountains and trees of winter and warm scarves and hats for our snow people’s sake. I enjoyed drawing the background more than I should have.

Anna

Anna

Anna’s artist statement: I had fun doing this project, it was very exciting. I made this project by tracing out my snowman and snowgirl. Then drawing the hills around them. Then in white I drew where the snow on the hills were going to be. After that I traced the trees in the background, then the trees in the middle ground and foreground. After that I filled in every part that was blank. Finally I shaded the snowmen and the hills, that is how the project was done.

Sophia: For this project I had to draw a snow scene. I thought that the hardest part was getting the snowmen drawn to blend in with the backround. I thought that draining the layers was fun. I thought that the cute l little chubby trees were a good example on how all trees are different. If I could do this again I would try to make another snow character.

Sophia

Sophia’s artist statement: For this project I had to draw a snow scene. I thought that the hardest part was getting the snowmen drawn to blend in with the background. I thought that drawing the layers was fun. I thought that the cute l little chubby trees were a good example on how all trees are different. If I could do this again I would try to make another snow character.

Tessa: For the winter I made a digital drawing of snowman on snowy hills. First I made the outline for everything, adding details on the snowman's face. Then I used flood fill to fill the hills, sky, trees and the snowman's features. Then with another layer I shaded. If I did this project again I would try to attempt snowy trees again. Although this project looks easy it is a bit challenging. But I still loved this project.

Tessa

Tessa’s artist statement: For the winter I made a digital drawing of snowman on snowy hills. First I made the outline for everything, adding details on the snowman’s face. Then I used flood fill to fill the hills, sky, trees and the snowman’s features. Then with another layer I shaded. If I did this project again I would try to attempt snowy trees again. Although this project looks easy it is a bit challenging. But I still loved this project.

Kevin: This week in art we had to make a snow scene. We had to use shading, trees, snow people, background, and a sky. For the snow people I made them normal snow man/snow woman. For the background I made it get darker the farther back it went, to make it look like it was farther away. If I were to change anything, I would try and work more on the shading.

Kevin

Kevin: This week in art we had to make a snow scene. We had to use shading, trees, snow people, background, and a sky. For the snow people I made them normal snow man/snow woman. For the background I made it get darker the farther back it went, to make it look like it was farther away. If I were to change anything, I would try and work more on the shading.

Cameron

Cameron

Cameron’s artist statement: In this snow scene, constructing it took a lot of flood fill. In the hills I used the same color just darkened it to make the illusion that you where looking out farther and farther. In the snowman, I used two layers. One for the outline the other for shading the snowman itself. My favorite part of the picture is the trees in the background.

Jared:To do this project, I used an app on my IPad called Sketchbook Express. I started off with the snowmen, then made the rolling hills. I tried to make the hills look like they were going farther back, so I made them get darker. Then I did the trees. The shadow of the snowmen I just made a darker color then the snow in that area. It was really fun making this picture, and I hope to use my IPad to do many different projects!

Jared

Jared’s artist statement: To do this project, I used an app on my IPad called Sketchbook Express. I started off with the snowmen, then made the rolling hills. I tried to make the hills look like they were going farther back, so I made them get darker. Then I did the trees. For the shadow of the snowmen I just made a darker color then the snow in that area. It was really fun making this picture, and I hope to use my IPad to do many different projects!

Ryan: Imagine your self in a war. A snowman war. Two snowmen soldiers, a medic and a standard soldier where sent through Johnny's Apple orchard. When phasing through the fence near the far back pine forest, they had a lot of walking ahead of them. Suddenly, half way through enemy territory, they are spotted! By... Now you as the viewer, imagine what happens next. Are they captured and brought to a furnace for melting?  Do they make a daring escape? It is up to you. When making this piece I liked using shading to show were the light came from. It was also fun that we could make the snowmen doing anything, only we had to have 2 of them, trees, hills, and the sky. I would do this again, 10/10.

Ryan

Ryan’s artist statement: Imagine yourself in a war. A snowman war. Two snowmen soldiers, a medic, and a standard soldier were sent through Johnny’s Apple orchard. When passing through the fence near the far back pine forest, they had a lot of walking ahead of them. Suddenly, half way through enemy territory, they are spotted! By…???
*Now you as the viewer, imagine what happens next. Are they captured and brought to a furnace for melting?
Do they make a daring escape? It is up to you.
When making this piece I liked using shading to show were the light came from. It was also fun that we could make the snowmen doing anything, only we had to have 2 of them, trees, hills, and the sky. I would do this again, 10/10.  

These are just a few of the Snow Scenes created on iPads last week. To see the whole gallery, go to: http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=918251&index=0

 

Leave a comment

It’s A Mention And It’s Honorable

I’ll take it! Thanks so much to The Art of Education for the Honorable Mention in the Art Ed Blog of the Year contest! Thanks to Massachusetts Art Education Association colleague and fellow board member, Billy Claire, for the nomination. Thanks also to any and all of the art educators across the United States who voted. Congratulations to the finalists and award winners. Let’s face it, folks, we are all winners here because we support and learn from each other every day through the blogs that we write and read. Teaching art can be lonely in an isolated art room; these blogs bring us together in a giant, warm, and fuzzy art education professional learning network of sharing and learning. Thanks again!

Honorable Mention

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,275 other followers

%d bloggers like this: